Category: Scenery

WorldEditor 1.4 Public Beta 1 Is Here

WorldEditor 1.4 public beta 1is available now.  First, the links:

  • Download from the WorldEditor page.
  • Report bugs on the gateway – the scenery tools have their own tab.
  • If you have reported bugs against WED in the past and the bug says “please retry in WED 1.4” or “fixed in WED 1.4”, please go re-check the bug now!

The online user’s manual is up-to-date; pick WED Manual from the help menu to see it and read about the new features.

I’ll try to write some release notes up later but there isn’t a procedure in place for WED for that right now.  Some major features:

Download from the X-Plane Scenery Gateway

I think the most important feature of the new build is the ability to directly download an airport from the scenery gateway. This feature is intended for authors and editors who want to modify and re-upload the scenery; in this case direct download has a number of advantages:

  • It’s a lot quicker and easier.
  • Better data quality: there’s a lot less data precision loss in the direct download because the format used is not binary DSF; overlay elements spanning DSF tiles will not be split when you get the airport directly.
  • Version tracking: when you download from the airport, WED knows the scenery ID you downloaded from and sets up a history chain when you re-upload.  This sets us up to more easily track changes and understand what are major airport changes vs. minor editing changes.

I think direct download is going to be especially good for bug-swatting.  If an airport had one small problem, it used to be that most of the work in fixing it was the import and export; this is now totally automated, so you can just download, edit, re-upload.

Orthophoto Creation

WED 1.4 builds orthophoto draped polygons for you.  In this workflow you:

  • Import source imagery, e.g. a TIFF or PNG.  If it’s a GeoTIFF, WED places it for you. (GeoTIFF placement is fixed in WED 1.4.)
  • WED converts the image format to DDS when you build the scenery pack.
  • WED makes the draped .pol file for you, and puts a correct LOAD_CENTER directive in place to get paging.

It’s a much quicker and simpler work-flow than the old scheme from WED 1.1 (which was basically a hack I put in for Sergio to get the LOWI demo area built for X-Plane 9).

If you want to make your own .pol files you can still use .pol files directly – WED works either way.

GeoJPEG-2000 Got Kicked Out

I turned off GeoJPEG-2000 support in this beta; our testing indicated that .jp2 was super-unstable and unreliable.  I’m not sure whether .jp2 will make it into this release or whether we’ll even keep the feature, but one thing is clear: it’s holding up an otherwise solid beta. There’s no reason why anyone should have to deal with broken GeoTIFF location, crashes on certain library scenery objects, or having to manually download from the Gateway for longer than necessary.

I still need to do more investigation into the crashes we’ve seen but so far the signs don’t look good – there are multiple indicators that point in the direction of .jp2 not being ready for prime-time.

 

Posted in News, Tools by | 11 Comments

GeoJP2K Makes Me Want to Stab Myself (or Where is WED)?

We should have had WED 1.4 beta days ago, but we do not. And the reason we do not is that some .jp2 files from the USGS do not import properly into WED. Others do, but going the ones that don’t are very common, and going beta with .jp2 files not working is asking for one hundred copies of the same bug to be filed within a day.

I now have a nasty hackworkaround for the problem: WED recognizes the particular projection that the problematic .jp2 files have and replaces the projection information with something the libraries we use can understand. This is a very brittle work-around but for now it’s all I can do.  I’ll post again when the beta goes live.

Posted in Scenery by | 11 Comments

RFC: Library Dependencies

This is another “Request for Comments” post – please discuss the proposal in the comments; if you comment asking about the OccRift your comment will be piped to /dev/null.

There’s one aspect of the library system that acts as a sharp unprotected corner, poking users on a regular basis: some scenery packs require other scenery packs to function. For example, many freeware airport scenery packs require OpenSceneryX. When the library pack is not available, X-Plane will not load the custom pack because it is missing art assets.* Users report this to us as a bug surprisingly often.

In my view, the big problem here is that a user has no way of knowing from X-Plane’s diagnostic message what library they should have installed. The diagnostic message isn’t useful because X-Plane doesn’t know either.  All X-Plane knows is that there was a library path, no one is providing art for it, and therefore life isn’t worth living.

The Proposal: Library Pack Dependencies

My proposal goes like this:

  • A library scenery pack can declare its “official name”, e.g. “opensceneryx” or “proaddons/trees” or what-ever.  Like plugin names, the goal is to pick a reasonably verbose name tied to your identity to avoid conflicts.  This directive would go in your library.txt file.
  • A scenery pack that needs that library declares a need for the library by the same name.
  • When X-Plane tries to load an art asset from the scenery pack and it is missing, if at least one dependent library is not present in the system, then the error message changes to something like

The scenery pack “KLAS Las Vegas” could not be loaded because the library “OpenSceneryX” is not installed.

The log.txt file would contain complete details, but hopefully it would be clear(er) to an end-user what has gone wrong: OpenSceneryX is missng, and thus KLAS Las Vegas cannot be used.

How Is The Link Made

In order for this proposal to work, scenery packs that require library X have to contain a directive stating so.  Therefore this proposal is not a cure-all for existing load problems. It would help in the long term as new scenery packs and libraries are created with these directives.

How would the link be made?  WorldEditor (or other scenery editing tools) would automatically write the dependency into the scenery pack by looking at the dependencies in place on the author’s machine and copying them into the scenery pack when the user picks “Build”.  Thus as long as the libraries had correct “naming” annotations (this does require library authors to update) then new packs made with WED would contain the right dependencies automatically.

Nasty Details

A few nasty details:

  • Library packs would need to contain both their “permanent” name and some kind of “human readable name” for error reporting.
  • The dependency statement in custom scenery packs would list the permanent names of needed libraries and copies of the human-readable names; if we need “librutrees” and it is missing, we don’t know that it’s real name is “Russian Trees 2.0” unless this has been copied at build time.
  • Dependencies would also need an integer version number.  This allows us to declare the case where the library is installed, but it is too old.

X-Plane’s built-in libraries would not contain dependency names because they are always available.

Dependency names for scenery packs would be written as DSF properties; there is no guarantee or need for the non-library scenery pack to have a library.txt file.

Open Issue: if a scenery pack declares a dependency and it is missing, should it be allowed to load if all of the art assets are present?  This is the more permissive use case, but it implies something fairly strange is happening on the end user’s machine. Permissiveness might be desirable during the transition into using dependency names.

Will It Work

The library system has (for quite a few years now) allowed “place-holder” objects to be declared in a scenery pack that act as fall-backs for missing objects.  The use case goes like this:

  • OpenSceneryX provides a “fallback” pack that is dumped directly into the scenery pack with blank objects for every library path.
  • If the end user has OpenSceneryX installed, they see the real art.
  • Otherwise they see nothing – the fallbacks are blank, and no error is generated.

It seems clear from the number of users who report a missing OpenSceneryX object as a “bug” that this is not working. Authors who use OpenSceneryX are not bothering to copy the “fallback” pack.  This might not even be a bug – maybe the authors don’t want their work being viewed without OpenSceneryX installed. My guess, however, is that the authors just don’t know that the fallback pack exists.  Since the authors have OpenSceneryX installed, they have no need for the fallback and can’t even tell if it is working properly.

My hope is that the library dependency scheme can be more successful in the long run because it requires no action by individual scenery authors, as long as a small number of library maintainers update their libraries.  The work of annotating scenery packs is automatic.

* Please do not try to convince me that what X-Plane should do is ignore this problem and proceed. With the RFC proposed above, we could do something less drastic, like not loading the scenery pack if the library isn’t present. But I am strongly against “load what we can and keep going”.

If X-Plane treats errors in authorship as acceptable results, then authors trying to get actual work done will have to do a lot more work to detect human mistakes in their own authorship. We need a bug to be a bug.

Posted in File Formats, Scenery, Tools by | 18 Comments

RFC: Dataref-Driven Library Regions

I have a working prototype of a proposed modification for X-Plane 10.40: dataref-driven library regions.

The idea is simple: you can define a region in a library pack, and X-Plane will only load those art assets when datarefs written into the library.txt file evaluate to true.

One of the main usages for this is to implement seasonal or winter scenery add-ons that don’t require rebooting the sim to take effect. Right now if you want to change the look of the scenery you either:

  1. Write a script to replace files inside X-Plane.  This makes updating X-Plane tricky, but it lets you mod anything.  Of course, some of those mods may not work in future versions.
  2. Create a custom library pack that replaces library paths for the default art.  This requires  reboot to take effect but doesn’t affect updates and is stable.

With this extension, method 2 can be done without a reboot.  The custom library art assets are put in a region and the region is set to only be available when certain datarefs are set to certain values.

Performance

Changes to the datarefs require a scenery re-load to take effect; that’s the cost of being able to fully change the art asset in the library.  This does allow for a lot of flexibility, however – whole objects can be added or removed based on the date, for example.  For seasonal use, if the user can decide on a season before flying, the reload should not be a facotr.

Textures vs Library Paths

The original proposal was to allow textures to be swapped by dataref. I changed to library paths because a number of the existing seasonal/winter add-ons for X-Plane change properties of art assets other than the textures; for example, they change specularity values or add normal maps that were not otherwise present.  Only changing the library art asset allows for complete customization.

Proposed Syntax

The new syntax is a single library.txt line:

REGION_DREF <dataref> <comparison> <value>

e.g.

REGION_DREF myplugin/use_snow == 1.0

Datarefs can come from the sim or a plugin; all six conditionals (< <= == != > >=) are available.  If more than one REGION_DREF line is present, all must evaluate to true to use the region.

Request For Comments

Please use the comments section to comment on this particular proposal. I’m going to be a bit fascist and nuke all off-topic comments.  This is about a specific proposed feature, not a general news update.

I have working code for this; if you’d like to try a developer build, please email me.

 

Posted in File Formats, RFC by | 12 Comments

Windows and Scenery Tools

Note: This post is a boring discussion of the state of the scenery tools. If you use MeshTool or you work on the scenery tools code – or would like to modify MeshTool’s code – read this post!  If you just want to know the status of the Oculus Rift or whether we’ve changed X-Planes’ fogging model, a little bit of your soul will die if you read this post.

Last weekend I discovered that MeshTool 3.0 seemed to “just work” for OS X; when I mentioned this on the blog I received a number of “I’d like a copy” emails. When I further emailed with those authors, I found that they all wanted a Windows build.

Unfortunately the Windows build of the scenery tools was in a state of disarray.  The Windows build was until recently based on running mingw and trying to make Windows look like Linux. This has a few problems:

  • Windows is not Linux.
  • Mingw is often a lower-tier priority (or non-priority) for the developers of the libs the scenery tools use.
  • It’s not easy to get a fully functional mingw environment to begin with.

A while ago Ted moved WorldEditor to MSVC.  This was a pretty big win: debugging actual problems with WED is about a billion times easier in MSVC (which has one of the best visual debuggers, um, ever) than trying to use gdb via mingw on Windows.  It also sets WED up to be worked on by actual real developers; if you are a programmer and Windows is your preferred platform, MSVC is mandatory; gcc/mingw/gdb is a foreign country.

So in response to MeshTool for Windows being borked due to mingw/Windows issues, I horse-traded with Chris: I’d do a bunch of his dev tasks if he’d port MeshTool to MSVC.

Will he succeed? I don’t want to say yes until it’s a done thing, but as of yesterday he did have MeshTool running, only to discover that libtiff was missing AdobeDeflate support. But I think his efforts do look promising.

The Plan

So here’s my plan for scenery tools:

  • MSVC will become the supported compiler for all scenery tools: WED, MeshTool, and the various command line tools (DSFTool, DDSTool, etc.).
  • The scenery tools will come with an MSVC .sln/.proj set to support them.
  • We will let mingw support die.  (If you want to make mingw work, send me patches, I’ll take them! But no one involved now has the expertise to keep mingw working, and it is already significantly broken.)
  • Gcc/Makefiles will be the supported platform for Linux, working on modern distros.
  • X-Code 3 will remain the supported compiler on OS X until we have time to do a Yosemite upgrade.  (A Yosemite upgrade is badly needed, but it’s also just a ton of work; I have not had time to even start on this.)
  • “RenderFarm” (the internal DSF tool we use for global scenery) will be the only non-MSVC-ported tool.

For libraries, Mac and Linux will continue to use the “libs” archive that exists now, which is a series of tarballs and a makefile that creates a static library pack for WED/Meshtool to use.  Libs is a GIT submodule.

For libraries, Windows will use a different sub-module that contains source materials and already-compiled Windows binaries for all needed libraries.  Windows users will simply have to get the submodule from GIT and they can immediately compile WED.  (This is already how WED on MSVC works, but we’ll form a submodule so that the main repo doesn’t get huge.)

For libraries, when we get to Yosemite, we may move OS X to a precompiled-binary strategy; we’ll have to see what the state of libraries is.

32-vs-64-bit

Right now the Linux scenery tools are compiled to the native ABI of the machine they are built on; binary builds are built on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS 64-bit, so those are 64-bit builds.

Windows is currently a 32-bit build; I believe Chris is working on both 32 and 64-bit support.

Mac build are limited to 32-bit due to the use of legacy APIs.

The long term direction of the scenery tools is 64-bit only!  At some point the “next” version of the scenery tools may be 64-bit only builds, and this may happen within the X-Plane 10 version run.  The scenery tools are free and not part of X-Plane itself; we don’t consider ourselves to be under any obligation to maintain 32-bit support indefinitely.

For the scenery tools, 64-bit support is a win because it allows the tools to access relatively huge source data sets.  There are global DSFs that currently can only be built on Linux because they require a 64-bit RenderFarm to load all road data without crashing.

Whither Betas?

There’s some restructuring to the various projects’ we’re doing as a result of all of this; I’m going to hold off WorldEditor beta until we’re done.  I’m hoping this will end in “days” – that’s all of the time Chris and I allocated for it. Therefore hopefully:

  • WED 1.4 public beta 1 next week. (I think I said that last week – I forgot to schedule in time to get the flu.)
  • MeshTool 3.0 public beta 1 next week too.  We’ve run a private beta on Mac/Linux and confirmed that MeshTool 3.0 basically works.  We’ll do a Windows build publicly.

We should also have a 10.35 release candidate Real Soon Now™.

Posted in Development, Scenery, Tools by | 9 Comments

Static Aircraft in Airports

This idea has been on my todo list for a while; I’m hoping to be able to squeeze it into X-Plane 10.40.*

Right now, you can place static aircraft in an X-Plane scenery pack using the library; if the aircraft come from our library, they can go into the gateway. If you use third party scenery packs for custom scenery, you can get even more aircraft types.

But this is not an ideal solution.

  • If you don’t place static aircraft, airports with AI planes disabled look empty.
  • If you do place static aircraft, they can conflict with real pilots on Pilot’s Edge, VATSIM, or any other online network.
  • If you use the AI, X-Plane will park AI planes at the ramp starts, so you must not put ramp starts where the static planes are.

This is a clearly inflexible and non-ideal solution.

Here’s my idea for a fix: X-Plane places static aircraft at real apt.dat ramp starts dynamically based on library paths and apt.dat information.

This way:

  • AI planes and static planes do not conflict.
  • An airport can be “emptied out” for online flight.
  • The level of static aircraft can be turned up and down based on hardware capabilities.
  • We can vary the static aircraft over time and take advantage of ramp types in the apt.dat file.

My thought is to do this sooner (e.g. 10.40) so we can all be working on gateway airports that place static aircraft the new “right way” for future expansion.  The longer we place static aircraft as OBJs, the more cleanup we will have to do.

* We have two release sizes: big and small.  1040 is the next ‘big’ release where crazy stuff can go and this feature is just barely complex enough that it needs a big release. Also, 1035 is already in beta so it missed that boat.

Posted in Scenery by | 34 Comments

“Transparent” Runways and Taxiways

Every now and then someone tries to set a taxiway in WED to “transparent”, and it pretty much never does what the author expects. Here’s a brief explanation of what’s going on.

Runways

“Transparent” is one of the many built-in surface types that runways can take on in X-Plane; more commonly you would pick asphalt, concrete, or grass. So what is a transparent runway?

The answer is: it is a runway with:

  1. No texture. That means you see nothing where the runway is. (This is fast by the way; we are not drawing the runway with a 100% clear texture, we actually don’t even place the polygons.)
  2. No physics. The runway does not change the physics from the underlying ground.

At this point a sane author is thinking: then what does a transparent runway actually do? Why have a no-op?

The answer is: user interface and lights.

  • A transparent runway is still a runway; and thus X-Plane can know “hey, there is a runway 3L at KXYZ airport.”  X-Plane even knows where the runway is (since the transparent runway has ends and a width) and can thus start your aircraft ont hat runway.
  • A transparent runway has approach lights and all other types of runway lights. A few of the common approach light fixtures with “rabbit” strobes are incredibly annoying to build by hand (you can do it, but you basically need a plugin, a gajillion objects, and super-human patience).

So the transparent runway lets you do the graphics and physics with draped polygons and leave the hard things (user interface and lights) to us.

The primary thing to note: the physics are up to you too, and the expectation is that you’ll do the physics with the same tool you’ll use for the graphics. So if you put a draped .pol file down, you can set its surface type (with the SURFACE directive) to match the visuals of the texture you are using.

Taxiways

Taxiways follow the same logic, and thus they are really quite silly.

  • Physics and graphics are up to you – the taxiway does nothing.
  • There really isn’t anything else to a taxiway; it isn’t part of the UI, and you can place taxi lights directly using light/line strings in WED.  You don’t actually need the taxiway polygon.

The fact that you can make a transparent taxiway in WED is actually a bug – the UI simply knows all surface types and does not have special code to say “hey, for a taxiway this is silly!”

What Transparent Taxiways Are Not

Transparent taxiways and runways are not a way to get the physics without the graphics. Instead, get the physics by putting a surface directive on your draped polygons.*

* There is one inefficiency here: if you have a huge draped orthophoto that covers a wide area, it will contain imagery that spans multiple surfaces: grass, concrete, etc.

Here is my suggestion: overlay a second polygon (with a repeating texture at very high res) with some kind of “grit” overlay.  Place this only on the areas with concrete (or asphalt, depending on the kind of grit you use) and set the overlay’s surface type to match the overlay’s appearance.  This way the polygons you must place for physics correctness at least add visual value too.

Posted in Scenery by | 16 Comments

Editing Gateway Airports (and Bit-Rot)

WorldEditor 1.4 is almost ready for beta, and among its new features (there are several big ones) one is very important to the X-Plane Airport Gateway:

  • WED 1.4 can browse airports on the gateway and download scenery packs directly into the WED workspace.

“Direct download” is really important for a few reasons, some of which might not be obvious:

  1. It saves time. Getting a gateway airport, even if you just want to look at it, is much faster when you don’t have to download the scenery pack, unzip it, install it, then import it into WED. Once you use direct download, you’ll wonder how you lived without it.
  2. It prevents mistakes. We have seen airport submissions where a user clearly downloaded a scenery pack, imported only the apt.dat (but not the DSF files) and then uploaded it. We cannot take scenery packs like that, because they fundamentally remove the 3-d data from the airport.  (A fundamental policy of the gateway is that if you upload a scenery pack and one already exists, yours can’t be worse than the existing one in some way.  We have to always move forward.)
  3. It provides ancestry information.  When you download and then upload directly from the Gateway in WED 1.4, WED provides the scenery pack ID of the original pack as the “parent” of the new pack.  This means that when Julian goes to look at an upload, he can look at the “original” and more rapidly spot problems.  If your pack is the same as the original except for taxi signs, he only needs to inspect taxi signs.
  4. It prevents data loss.  DSF is a slightly lossy data format – that is, if you get your data back out of a DSF file, it won’t be exactly the same as what you put in. (It is like a JPEG image in that regard.)

More on that last point: DSF stands for Distribution Scenery Format – it was meant as a way to make final scenery packs; it was not meant as an interchange format for continuous editing.  So users are constantly importing and exporting DSFs to do work, small rounding errors (“bit rot”) will creep into our 3-d, and features that were perfectly aligned might not be well aligned after 4 or 5 edits.

The internal format for scenery on the gateway is not binary DSF files, so doing round trips to the gateway has much less “bit rot” than importing scenery packs.

Finally, DSFs are tiles; if your airport spans a DSF boundary, all DSF features (polygons, fences, etc.) get split along the DSF boundaries.

So if you import a scenery pack that you downloaded, you’re getting the split version, which is harder to edit and work with.

The internal format of scenery packs on the gateway is not split, and thus you can edit the original in almost the same form as it was uploaded.

WorldEditor 1.4 beta should becoming in “weeks” (and hopefully not that many weeks); I’ll post here when we are ready for beta testers.

Posted in Development, File Formats, Scenery, Tools by | 25 Comments

Please Help Find Crashing Scenery

I’ve been fielding crash-related bug reports for X-Plane 10,30, and a lot of them are turning out to be caused by third party scenery packs.

Now there are two possibilities for why a third party scenery pack might crash X-Plane:

  1. There is a bug in X-Plane.  In this case, I want to fix the bug!
  2. There is something wrong with the data in the scenery pack (that is, the data doesn’t meet X-Plane’s expectations).  In this case, I want to change the result from a crash to some kind of clear error report that an author could use to fix the problem.

The Old Rules

During my work on the scenery system for X-Plane 8 and 9, my view was “garbage in, garbage out” – that is, if you feed junk data into the scenery system, the result would be unpredictable and could include a crash.  In X-Plane 8, scenery load was completely synchronous – that is, your flight just stopped while we loaded files, so my idea at the time was that validation of scenery files should be done ahead of time, perhaps by the tools that write those files.

That logic (if it was even a good idea back then) doesn’t apply now.  Loading is done entirely on other CPU cores and does not interrupt flight; we can take the CPU time to make sure incoming data is valid.  And the cost of not validating the data is clear:

  • The instability from badly formed data results in a sea of crash reports – if we have real serious sim bugs, it’s much harder to catch them in the noise.
  • Because we don’t trap bad data, the end result crash can be in the OpenGL driver (due to cascading errors), and due to the way 64-bit crash detection works, we don’t get any trace of the contributing X-Plane code path.
  • Authors who create scenery packs can’t tell if their pack is the source of crash, or how their data induced a crash.

My goal is to chase down crashes caused by third party scenery and both fix any bugs that emerge and tighten up error checking to detect the cause of crashes early on, in a way that is useful to authors.

The New Rules

Because X-Plane has not run validation over all scenery files in the past, there are probably scenery files in use now that contain data that I would consider illegal (either by the documented format, or just by my own view of how the file format was meant to work; I realize that second definition is quite useless to authors).  But for illegal data that doesn’t crash the sim, I can’t just go in and change X-Plane to reject that data in the next patch.  (“Surprise!  Your scenery packs won’t load!” isn’t cool.)

So my thinking for validation is:

  • Detected error conditions that would have caused a crash 100% of the time can be handled by any clear means possible, including quitting the sim with an error message. If the sim can handle the error and continue, that’s better, but even a controlled quit with diagnostics is an improvement over an uncontrolled crash.
  • Detected error conditions that would have crashed the sim some of the time need to be logged but can’t quit the sim or cancel loading of the entire scenery pack; while a crash is serious, users were probably still enjoying the scenery pack (and merely being annoyed at how unstable their flying experience was).  The user experience shouldn’t get worse.
  • Detected error conditions that have only minor effects (e.g. out of range values that might cause rendering artifacts) whose legal values are well-documented can be logged, perhaps with a noisy error.  The pack works, so quitting or refusing to load is not acceptable, but if the error is too quiet, the condition will never get fixed.
  • Detected error conditions that have only minor effects whose legal values were never documented need to be logged unobtrusively; it’s not fair of me to penalize scenery packs for failing to read my mind.

On those first two points: one of the issues that complicates validation of scenery packs is that some errors are not discovered until mid-flight, because scenery is processed while you fly.  This means that a large scenery pack might contain areas that are problematic to fly in; if the original author doesn’t cover every inch of scenery in a test flight, the author might not know about the problem.

The ATC system takes a more aggressive approach: it validates every single .atc file at load time even if it doesn’t need to use the data until later.  (Virtual air traffic controllers are instantiated near the aircraft as the user flies, but the data in the .atc files that will be used to set up those controllers is checked at load time.)

This approach wasn’t too expensive performance-wise: the .atc files are small and the ATC system has to read them anyway to index them for later use.  I am not sure how to best replicate this for scenery; consider Alpilotx’s HD scenery mesh – reading every single DSF in Europe at load time isn’t acceptable performance wise but without that, how can he know that his scenery doesn’t contain areas that could crash X-Plane?

Please Send Me Bogus Scenery Packs

Here’s where I need you to help: if you find X-Plane is crashing, and you find that removing a scenery pack fixes the crash, please report a bug, including the scenery pack (or where to get it) and where you had to fly/start up to induce the crash.  Even if it is the fault of the pack (and it may not be – it may be an X-Plane bug!!!!) I still want to clamp down on the failure condition.

Posted in File Formats, Scenery, Tools by | 21 Comments

Blender 2.49 Users: Don’t Get Yosemite

If you develop 3-d models for X-Plane using Blender 2.49 on OS X, do not upgrade to OS X 10.10 (Yosemite).  Something changed in the OS that causes the python scripts to not load, which means you won’t be able to export.

(As a side note, I am of the opinion that if you use your computer for work, you should not install major OS upgrades without investigating first.  If Apple is going to break support for something intentionally, it will be in a major version.  Once you install the new OS, going back is hard.  So why jump in so fast?  These days I don’t believe that any one OS update is so much better than what was there before that it trumps keeping your productivity software working.  But then, as Chris points out, I am older than dirt.)

Update: Chris found a way to make Blender 2.49 work with Yosemite.  For reasons unclear to us, the Python 2.5 framework that comes with the OS in Yosemite is just a symlink to version 2.6 (rather than the real Python 2.5).  If you delete the symlink and put in place the old 2.5 binary from an older OS, Blender starts working again.  I’ll post instructions when we have something written up in readable form, but this is a tricky mod at best – you have to change admin-writeable files in your library.

Update #2: Hi guys, Chris here. Here’s an outline of the steps that you’ll need to take…and you’ll need to be an administrator of course since you’ll be running sudo. A basic disclaimer….you should have a full bootable and recent backup of your system anytime you mess with system files (even though this should be relatively straight forward). These instructions worked for us but you should follow them at your own risk.

  1. Go into your time machine archives or find a friend that has 10.8 or whatever version of OSX you used to be on, and obtain a copy of the Python 2.5 version framework at this path and put it somewhere accessible:
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.5
  2. Open Terminal
  3. Change directories by running
    cd /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/
  4. To be safe, type:
    ls -al

    to get a full directory listing. If you see 2.5 -> 2.6, you have a symlink from 2.5 to 2.6 which is what’s causing Blender to use the wrong Python version. IF YOU DON’T SEE THIS, YOU DON’T HAVE A PROBLEM!

  5. Delete the symlink by running
    sudo rm -rf 2.5
  6. Copy the old version of 2.5 into this location (pay attention to the dot at the end!):
    sudo cp -R some/path/to/the/good/2.5 .
  7. Now as good practice, let’s put the permissions the way they should be:
    sudo chown -R root 2.5
    sudo chgrp -R wheel 2.5
  8. As one of our artists discovered, if Step #7 fails for you because “wheel” is not a known group name, it might be a good idea to run Disk Utility and let it “Fix Permissions” on your drive.
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